My Cart  
You haven’t added anything to your cart yet. Once you add an item, you’ll see it here.

Total

Checkout
 

Yahoo Announces that 1 Billion Accounts Compromised in Data Breach

Identity Theft News

Yahoo Announces that 1 Billion Accounts Compromised in Data Breach

As you may have heard, Yahoo just announced that over 1 Billion accounts were hacked in a recent data breach. This information includes account holder names, email addresses, encrypted passwords, dates of birth, telephone numbers and, in some cases, security questions and answers.

Here are a few proactive steps you can take to protect your account:

  • Change your account password even if Yahoo doesn't prompt you to do so.
  • Choose new security questions and answers for your Yahoo account, and any other accounts on which you used the same or similar questions/answers.
  • Be wary if you get odd email messages from a friend with a Yahoo email account as it might be that their account was taken over by a scammer.
  • Be wary of email, even if it looks legitimate. Scammers can copy logos and mask the sender's address to appear to be from a trusted person or business.
  • Be suspicious if you get a call from Yahoo. They will not call you. Understand that caller id can be masked to appear to be a call from someone or some business familiar to you.
  • Make sure you've activated your monitoring available to you through your IDShield membership. www.myidshield.com 
  • If you have any concerns or questions at all, please contact us at 888-494-8519.

Make the Most of Your IDShield Membership

To sign up for identity theft protection from IDShield, please call us at 888-494-8519 or visit us at www.idshield.com.

If you are currently a member, make sure that you’ve activated all the monitoring available to you through your IDShield membership. As always, if you have any questions IDShield contact us at 888-494-8519.

As you may have heard, Yahoo just announced that over 1 Billion accounts were hacked in a recent data breach. This information includes account holder names, email addresses, encrypted passwords, dates of birth, telephone numbers and, in some cases, security questions and answers.

Here are a few proactive steps you can take to protect your account:

  • Change your account password even if Yahoo doesn't prompt you to do so.
  • Choose new security questions and answers for your Yahoo account, and any other accounts on which you used the same or similar questions/answers.
  • Be wary if you get odd email messages from a friend with a Yahoo email account as it might be that their account was taken over by a scammer.
  • Be wary of email, even if it looks legitimate. Scammers can copy logos and mask the sender's address to appear to be from a trusted person or business.
  • Be suspicious if you get a call from Yahoo. They will not call you. Understand that caller id can be masked to appear to be a call from someone or some business familiar to you.
  • Make sure you've activated your monitoring available to you through your IDShield membership. www.myidshield.com 
  • If you have any concerns or questions at all, please contact us at 888-494-8519.

Make the Most of Your IDShield Membership

To sign up for identity theft protection from IDShield, please call us at 888-494-8519 or visit us at www.idshield.com.

If you are currently a member, make sure that you’ve activated all the monitoring available to you through your IDShield membership. As always, if you have any questions IDShield contact us at 888-494-8519.

Simple Steps to Protect Yourself Against Identity Theft

March 17, 2017

Despite the fact that the U.S. Director of National Intelligence ranked cybercrime as the No. 1 national security threat, very few Americans take real steps to protect themselves, their family and their businesses against identity theft.

As the head of a company that helps consumers protect themselves from this issue, I've become increasingly aware of its perils, and how it impacts millions of people each year. I see identity theft as a growing epidemic that warrants immediate action. There are a number of simple steps to take, and some may seem obvious, but many people choose not to address the issue with preventive measures. How often do you back up personal and corporate computers, check your credit report and statements, or update your virus protection software?

When Consumers Get Smart, Scammers Get Smarter

March 16, 2017

So you think you’re pretty smart when it comes to scams. You know there is no wealthy Nigerian prince who needs money to escape – and there’s certainly no reward for sending him your hard-earned cash. You’re careful to not click on links or open attachments from email addresses you do not recognize. But as consumers become more aware, scammers become more savvy. They know we live online and on our phones, and they use both to get even the most wary individuals to fall for their scams. However, there are some steps you can take to avoid becoming a victim.

 

When it comes to phone scams, be smart with these tips:

Stay Calm and Trust No One: Protecting Yourself Against Scammers

March 16, 2017

Tax scams grab a lot of identity theft headlines, and for good reason: the Better Business Bureau (BBB) advises that 25 percent of reported scams in 2016 were related to tax issues. But there’s more than one way to scam a consumer, and scammers are constantly thinking up new and more sophisticated ways to lure in victims. According to the BBB, last year’s fastest growing scams included:

 

Online Purchase Scams

These may involve sites selling fake merchandise, as well as sites that aren’t selling anything at all. By the time your “designer” duds have arrived, or you realize you’ll never get what you paid for, the scammers have your money as well as your name, address and credit card information, which is what they are really after.

 

Employment Scams

Tax season ramps up W-2 phishing scams

February 10, 2017

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) recently issued an urgent alert regarding a dangerous W-2 phishing scam that is targeting employers across a wide variety of sectors, including everything from businesses to schools to tribal organizations. Not only is this type of fraud becoming widespread, there is a unique twist to this scheme, designed to further compound the potential injury. After fraudulently obtaining the W-2 information, scammers send an immediate follow-up requesting a wire transfer of funds. When a company falls victim to this scam, not only do their employees face the possibility of tax fraud from the stolen W-2 forms, but the company also loses funds from the fraudulent wire transfer. It is a double whammy, and according to the IRS, it has already affected hundreds of organizations.

The Underground Economy and Your Identity

January 18, 2017

The past several years have been a bonanza for the underground economy as it relates to the purchase and sale of stolen private information and, specifically, to the sheer number of individual consumer records impacted. Numerous large merchants, hospital systems, and insurance companies have been hacked, exposing email addresses and passwords, credit card numbers, and personal profiles. These breaches have resulted in a considerable surge in private personal information being made available for sale in the underground economy. Throughout this same timeframe, security companies, researchers, and hackers have commented on the vast amounts of data that have been stolen and are now available for purchase online. Indeed, we have heard all too often from the popular media that billions of personal records have been compromised.

How to Respond to Suspicious IRS-related Communication this Tax Season

January 18, 2017

It’s that time of year once again. The holidays have come and gone and we’re all settling into a new year. With all of our resolutions aside, one thing is still left to do - our taxes. This season is also the time where IRS-related scams are plentiful.  

It’s important to know that the IRS does not initiate contact with taxpayers by any type of electronic communication, including email, text messages, and social media channels. Here, we share some IRS direction for handling a suspicious IRS-related communication.

If you receive an email claiming to be from the IRS that contains a request for personal information:

  • Do not reply.
  • Do not open any attachments. Attachments may contain malicious code that will infect your computer.
  • Do not click on any links.
  • Forward the email as-is, to phishing@irs.gov. After you forward the email, delete the original email message you received.

Note: Please forward the full original email to   phishing@irs.gov. Do not forward scanned images of printed emails as that strips the email of valuable information only available in the electronic copy.