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Yahoo Announces that 1 Billion Accounts Compromised in Data Breach

Identity Theft News

Yahoo Announces that 1 Billion Accounts Compromised in Data Breach

As you may have heard, Yahoo just announced that over 1 Billion accounts were hacked in a recent data breach. This information includes account holder names, email addresses, encrypted passwords, dates of birth, telephone numbers and, in some cases, security questions and answers.

Here are a few proactive steps you can take to protect your account:

  • Change your account password even if Yahoo doesn't prompt you to do so.
  • Choose new security questions and answers for your Yahoo account, and any other accounts on which you used the same or similar questions/answers.
  • Be wary if you get odd email messages from a friend with a Yahoo email account as it might be that their account was taken over by a scammer.
  • Be wary of email, even if it looks legitimate. Scammers can copy logos and mask the sender's address to appear to be from a trusted person or business.
  • Be suspicious if you get a call from Yahoo. They will not call you. Understand that caller id can be masked to appear to be a call from someone or some business familiar to you.
  • Make sure you've activated your monitoring available to you through your IDShield membership. www.myidshield.com 
  • If you have any concerns or questions at all, please contact us at 888-494-8519.

Make the Most of Your IDShield Membership

To sign up for identity theft protection from IDShield, please call us at 888-494-8519 or visit us at www.idshield.com.

If you are currently a member, make sure that you’ve activated all the monitoring available to you through your IDShield membership. As always, if you have any questions IDShield contact us at 888-494-8519.

The New Teen Hangout

August 16, 2017

Social Media: The New Teen Hangout

 

From an early age, parents advise their children to not talk to strangers. That advice may stick with a child who is approached by someone at the park, but a teenager who feels “protected” by a screen may carry on an online conversation with a person they don’t know, especially if the “stranger” is posing as a classmate, a friend of a friend, or someone who shares the teen’s taste in music. If that conversation leads to an in-person meeting, your teen may be in serious danger.

 

IDShield Investigator Tips: Phishing Attempt Not Very Rewarding

July 27, 2017

A few weeks ago, I received an email from Marriott Rewards. Was I getting bonus points? A special offer for a last-minute weekend trip? Or was it something much less rewarding? 

As an expert in cyber security, I’m understandably suspicious of all emails. Phishers have gotten so good at making fake emails look real that it is easy to, at a glance, believe the message is from an individual or organization you have done business with, but there are some things you can look for so you do not take the bait and become a victim. What better way to demonstrate than by my actual example?

The Anatomy of a Phishing Email

This is what I first saw in my inbox:

 

Could Smart Toys Put Your Child’s Privacy at Risk?

July 19, 2017

FBI releases warning regarding privacy concerns for internet-connected toys

The Federal Bureau of Investigation released a public service announcement alerting consumers to the potential dangers of “smart toys,” basically any toy that can connect to the internet. This applies to a range of toys currently on the market that have everything from microphones to cameras to cloud storage of audio, video, and other data collected from users.

The FBI raises concerns about toys negatively impacting your children’s privacy and security.

 

The features and functions of different toys vary widely. In some cases, toys with microphones could record and collect conversations within earshot of the device. Information such as the child’s name, school, likes and dislikes, and activities may be disclosed through normal conversation with the toy or in the surrounding environment. The collection of a child’s personal information combined with a toy’s ability to connect to the Internet or other devices raises concerns for privacy and physical safety. 

 

A Trip to the Pediatrician’s Office May Cure the Sickness, But Could It Put Your Child’s Identity at Risk?

July 11, 2017

By the time children are six years old, they have probably been to the pediatrician more than 10 times for wellness checkups alone. With many children continuing to see their pediatricians through their teen years, these office visits – and the information collected at them – all add up. As a parent, you trust the pediatrician and the office staff to take care of your child’s health, but can you trust that your child’s personal information will be securely protected and kept out of harm’s way? Assuming this has not previously crossed your mind, increasing your level of awareness – just as is done with an annual health check – can help to protect your child’s identity from being compromised and exploited.

Health Care Data Breaches on the Rise

WannaCry Ransomware

May 16, 2017

Over the past 72 hours, a massive ransomware attack occurred affecting businesses, government organizations, and individuals in well over 100 countries. The ransomware – called WannaCry (also called WannaCrypt) – encrypts the victim’s hard drive and demands a ransom, paid in the virtual currency bitcoin, equivalent to approximately US$300. Kroll strongly recommends organizations and individuals take action to reduce your risk and prepare for inevitable future similar attacks.

 

What is Ransomware?

Ransomware is a type of malware; once executed on a computer system, it seeks to encrypt a wide range of files, denying the user access, and effectively holding the files “hostage” in return for a monetary payment – a ransom. It prevents users from accessing their computers, files, or mobile devices by holding them for ransom. Users are typically expected to pay high ransom amounts to get access back to their data. Many times, the ransomware will falsely claim that the user has committed a crime with their computer, and that they are being fined by the police department or a government agency.

 

U.S. Government Data Shows Healthcare Breaches Up 320%

May 11, 2017

Check the pulse of your personal healthcare information

 

When you visit your physician or a healthcare facility, the last thing on your mind is the personal information you are required to share. Where is it going? Who sees your information? What could happen to it? Healthcare providers collect personal data ranging from your name and date of birth, to credit card numbers, medical insurance numbers (which may include your Social Security number), diagnosis information, prescriptions, and medical history.

 

Providers are required to store this information securely, but data thieves know how valuable your personal information is. Despite healthcare providers’ best efforts, they often fall victim to data breaches. That puts your protected health information (PHI) in the hands of hackers and thieves who may use it themselves or sell it for others to use to execute a variety of schemes and crimes.