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Blog > Internet Security > 5 Ways to Improve Your Family’s Cybersecurity
 February 15, 2016

5 Ways to Improve Your Family’s Cybersecurity

It is easy to fall into bad habits or ignore cybersecurity at home

With a wide range of personal, financial and medical information stored online, taking time to strengthen your family’s online security could save you time, money and aggravation.

This article includes basic tips that will provide peace of mind and help reduce risk:

  1. Protect Your Network – Failing to protect your home wireless network is like leaving your door wide open. Password protecting your network is a good place to start, but there are other steps you must take to truly protect your network. You should also change your security defaults and set up a firewall. Learn more about how to secure your home network.
  2. Protect Your Computer – Utilize antivirus software to protect your computer from viruses, malware, and spyware. Update your antivirus software, operating system, and other applications often. Software updates include important security patches that protect your computer from known flaws and threats. Be cautious when downloading email attachments. Many spam or fraudulent email attachments contain malicious software. You should also fully shut down your computer when not in use for extended periods.
  3. Protect Your Cellphone – Current smartphones are more powerful than many home computers were 10 years ago. It is important to take similar precautions to protect your cell phone and your private data. This includes locking your phone when not in use, as well as using strong passwords and encryption.
  4. Protect Your Children – Child predators and scammers target children on social networks, gaming sites, message boards and via email. It is important to begin teaching children about online safety early but you should also keep an open dialogue with older children and teens. The National Children’s Advocacy Center offers helpful tips on teaching your children about online safety. You should also be aware of how the information you post online may put your children at risk. Click here to read our alert on the risks of posting GPS-tagged photos of your children.
  5. Protect Your Wallet – Each year hundreds of thousands of people fall victim to online scams. Familiarizing yourself with common schemes will help protect you and your family. The best rule of thumb to follow is that if something seems too good to be true, it probably is. Read our article, “Scam Alert: Beware Scare Tactics”. You can also read more about online scams at OnGuardOnline.gov.

Get help from the professionals

You don’t have to protect your private information on your own. You can proactively arm yourself against cybercrimes and reputation hijacking. IDShield, your all-inclusive solution to identity protection, monitoring, and restoration, now brings you enhanced privacy and reputation management consultation.

IDShield is a product of Pre-Paid Legal Services, Inc. d/b/a LegalShield (“LegalShield”). LegalShield provides access to identity theft protection and restoration services. For complete terms, coverage and conditions, please see www.idshield.com. All Licensed Private Investigators are licensed in the state of Oklahoma. This is not intended to be legal advice. Please contact an attorney for legal advice or assistance. If you are a LegalShield member, you should contact your Provider Law Firm.

ESS

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